Meat Free Monday Recipes

It can be difficult to know what to eat if you’re used to consuming meat frequently. We’ve got a couple of Meat Free Monday recipes that’ll stop you craving meat and you’ll want to eat everyday of the week!

Veggie Bolognese

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Ingredients: 

  • 150g pasta
  • 1tbsp vegetable oil
  • 1 carrot, grated
  • frozen veggie mince
  • 1 tin of tomatoes
  • 2 cloves of garlic
  • 1 small red onion
  • 1tsp dried basil
  • 1tsp dried oregano
  • 2 tbsp tomato puree
  • sprinkle of salt and pepper

Method:

  • Fry onions and garlic in oil add veggie mince
  • Add herbs and tomato puree
  • Once onions are caramelised, add tinned tomatoes.
  • Cook pasta, add bolognese, garnish with grated carrot.

Sweet Potato, Coconut & Spinach Curry

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Ingredients:

  • 1 red onion
  • 3 cloves of garlic
  • 1tsp vegetable oil
  • 1 large sweet potato
  • 1 tin of coconut milk
  • 1 tin of tomatoes
  • 2 tsp of tomato puree
  • 2 handfuls of spinach
  • 2 tsp desiccated coconut
  • 1 tsp cumin
  • 1tsp paprika
  • 1tsp ground coriander
  • 1/2 tsp cayenne pepper
  • 2 tsp turmeric
  • 1 tsp masala curry powder
  • 2 tbsp nutritional yeast
  • 2 tbsp corn flour
  • 80g rice of choice.

Method:

  • Fry onion and garlic in oil, add spices and tomato puree
  • Add coconut milk, tinned tomatoes, par-boiled sweet potato and spinach.
  • Let simmer, then add cornflour and nutritional yeast.
  • Cook rice with double the amount of water.
  • Top with desiccated coconut. Serve curry once as thick as desired.

If you try either of these recipes, share them on twitter and tag @sustainabledmu, we’d love to see them!

– Alexandra Kilcran, Green Behaviour Change Frontrunner

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Artwork With an Environmental Twist

Final Year Fine Art student at DMU, Helen Gunn, has been producing some very interesting work around ecology  and sustainability and we thought we should share it with everyone.

This is the piece: ‘Broken – Crassulaceae’ 

The large sculpture was exhibited indoors and then installed in the DMU car park for a day in the summer of 2016.

crassulacae

crassulaceae

The sculpture concerns a plant, ecology and migration. The form is based on a perennial sedum belonging to the Crassulaceae family which evolved 100-60 million years ago.

The eco-artist stated that the Crassulaceae ‘Is a popular ‘bought garden plant’ because it conveniently survives neglect.  By representing the flower umbel with toy vehicles I make comparisons between the plant’s longevity and the short-lived era of the automobile; between global auto trade with its brand divisions and Crassulaceae species hybridisation and global spread through natural and cultivated systems.  The reversal of car scale to plant privileges the sedum representation, disturbing typical hierarchies and honours Crassulaceae longevity, also plant capacity to absorb harmful CO2 emissions released by driven vehicles.  The sculpture is constructed from recycled woods.  By presenting it as ‘stem broken’ the perennial capacity for re-growth is acknowledged. Vehicles forming the umbel were donated by children.’

Helen also created another piece titled ‘Green House’.
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The sculpture is made from hanging panels which are ‘sacrificial boards’. Wooden panels which are sacrificed during the fabrication of other projects.

Helen’s future work will focus on the changing climate and attitudes towards nature during this period.

Special thanks to Helen Gunn, for letting us discuss her brilliant environmental and Eco-conscious sculptures!

🌱 🌱 🌱 🌱 🌱 🌱 🌱 🌱 🌱 🌱 🌱 🌱 🌱 🌱 🌱 🌱 🌱 🌱 🌱 🌱 🌱 🌱 🌱 🌱 🌱 🌱 🌱 🌱 🌱 🌱 🌱 🌱

– Alexandra Kilcran, Green Behaviour Change Frontrunner